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Boundary Wall and Entrance Gates to S of Seamouth Lodge

A Grade II Listed Building in St Brides Major, Vale of Glamorgan

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.4461 / 51°26'45"N

Longitude: -3.605 / 3°36'17"W

OS Eastings: 288557

OS Northings: 173120

OS Grid: SS885731

Mapcode National: GBR HC.N1Y8

Mapcode Global: VH5HQ.GXJ9

Entry Name: Boundary Wall and Entrance Gates to S of Seamouth Lodge

Listing Date: 3 March 1999

Last Amended: 3 March 1999

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 21791

Building Class: Gardens, Parks and Urban Spaces

Location: Forming the S part of the W boundary of Dunraven Park. Located between the SW angle of Seamouth Lodge and the shore-line, then curving round to the cliffs.

County: Vale of Glamorgan

Community: St. Bride's Major (Saint-y-Brid)

Community: St Brides Major

Locality: Dunraven Park

Traditional County: Glamorgan

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Saint Brides Major

History

Dunraven Castle, an early C19 castellated gothic-style mansion, was situated on a cliff top overlooking the sea. The site has a long and almost continuous history, starting as an Iron Age hillfort. A Norman castle here was awarded to the de Londres family of Ogmore, and then to the Butlers. It was probably rebuilt in the C15 as a manor house, and recorded thus by Leland in the 1530s as a ‘the manor place’. It is shown in an engraving of c 1776 with features such as mullioned windows. At this time it is said to have included many of the older elements including a chapel and burial place. It passed to the Vaughans, then to the Wyndham family in the C16, and finally to the Earls of Dunraven.

The castle was rebuilt in 1802-6 by Thomas Wyndham of Clearwell Castle, Gloucestershire, as a hunting seat. The design was drawn up by Mrs Wyndham, though it appears to be based on the design for Clearwell Castle, by Roger Morris, 1728. It was remodelled in 1858 by Egbert Moxham, for Caroline Wyndham; the central tower was replaced by a conservatory and the N and S wings were raised. It was extended with a tower and wing on the seaward side by George Devey in 1886-8. The castle was demolished in 1962, having been used as a hotel, and only the footings survive.

The park was a deer park in the C17. The park walls, lodges, entrances and drives are probably contemporary with the rebuilding of the house in 1802-6. The sea walks in the park were designed by Lord Dunraven in 1840.

Probably early C19, and contemporary with the rebuilding of the castle in 1802-6. Possibly replacing earlier walls to the Deer Park.

Exterior

Rubble stone wall with high saddleback coping, partly replaced in concrete. The wall runs S and then curves round to the SE. The Nant-y-Durfol exits the park from the E, and enters a culvert which is built into the wall. The culvert has a segmental arched head with voussoirs. Above it is a cut-in opening with red brick jambs and an iron lintel. To the N is a later V-shaped opening for a stile with steps to each side.

At the N end of the wall are 2 gates, 1 for vehicles and 1 for pedestrians. Both gates are wooden with pierced trefoiled lancets above the mid-rail and a row of quatrefoils below. The main gate has 6 lancets and a coat of arms on the exterior side, while the pedestrian gate has 3 lancets. To the S side of the main gate and between the 2 gates are octagonal stone piers with swept pyramidal caps with finials. To the N is a matching half octagonal pier built onto the lodge.

Reasons for Listing

Listed as a defining feature of the park with distinctive character.
Group value with Seamouth Lodge, boundary wall to N, and other listed items in the park.

Other nearby listed buildings

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