History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Winnington Turn Bridge

A Grade II Listed Building in Northwich, Cheshire West and Chester

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 53.2703 / 53°16'13"N

Longitude: -2.5388 / 2°32'19"W

OS Eastings: 364162

OS Northings: 374948

OS Grid: SJ641749

Mapcode National: GBR BZQM.4D

Mapcode Global: WH99B.Z267

Entry Name: Winnington Turn Bridge

Listing Date: 31 October 2005

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1391406

English Heritage Legacy ID: 494160

Location: Northwich, Cheshire West and Chester, CW8

County: Cheshire West and Chester

Parish: Northwich

Traditional County: Cheshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cheshire

Listing Text

NORTHWICH

1635/0/10018 WINNINGTON LANE
31-OCT-05 Winnington Turn Bridge

II
Swing bridge and control cabin on Weaver Navigation, 1908/9 with C20 additions, cast steel. Two storey brick control cabin with ground floor and lower ground floor, slate roof.

Cast steel bridge painted black and white with girders underneath, one pivot span and single lane vehicle access. Pivot sits on south (Northwich) bank. Later C20 pedestrian walkway fixed to western bridge elevation and north cabin elevation. Reverse 'l' shaped plan brick control cabin sits west of bridge on south bank. Assymetrical saltbox-style slate roof, ridge tiles, and spear finial atop north gable. Small pane casement windows form continuous band to north elevation continuing around north east and north west corners. Small round arched window with brick voussoirs beneath eaves line on west elevation. South elevation has small round arched window flanked by 2 doorways all with brick voussoirs at heads. Small brick courtyard adjacent to south elevation. East doorway with stone steps, west doorway with one stone step and one later C20 concrete replacement. Steps lead down by west elevation to pivot machinery and canal, all but top 3 later C20 replacement.

HISTORY: Constructed in 1908/9 the electrically operated swing bridge replaces an earlier version constructed in 1901, which proved inadequate both in terms of carrying capacity and design. Along with the neighbouring Town Bridge (1899) and Hayhurst Bridge (1899) in Northwich, Winnington is one of the earliest swing bridges in Britain to have electric power.
The bridge enabled greater carrying capacity of road loads and an increase in the navigable waterway available thus enabling trade expansion and business growth in the area's chemical industry. The swing bridge also controlled the water level at Northwich.

SOURCES:
Hadfield C & Biddle G. 'The Canals of North West England Volume 1'. 1970
Hadfield C & Biddle G. 'The Canals of North West England Volume 2'. 1970
David Owens Waterway Archive - 'Winnington Swing Bridge'

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANCE
Winnington Turn Bridge is a single pivot span steel bridge with associated brick control cabin on the Weaver Navigation. The bridge has special architectural interest as an example of an early electrically operated swing bridge. In addition, it is historically significant in the development of the Weaver Navigation and the growth of the pottery and chemical industries of Winnington and Northwich.
The bridge and cabin can also be said to form part of a group with Town Bridge and Hayhurst Bridge further along the navigation in Northwich.
SJ6416274964

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Selected Sources

Source links go to a search for the specified title at Amazon. Availability of the title is dependent on current publication status. You may also want to check AbeBooks, particularly for older titles.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.